HDR: ENF– USE You’ve got more options!

Don’s mantra of Shoot What you Feel is a great way for you to think about your own photography and what you are trying to do.  My ‘mantra’ is one that complements Don’s: Get The Shot YOU Want.  So, if you’re trying to convey a particular feeling or simply to capture a subject in it’s best ‘light’ then know how to do it and what to look for.  Everyone knows I’m a fan of HDR.  I use HDR techniques more often than not.  I’ll even photograph a scene with 3-5 different exposures and determine at home on my PC if I ned the extra shots.  Sometimes I may only use one of the ‘extra’ images.  Other times I’ll use 3, or 5.  If you’re at location and the light is great don’t just take a shot>>>>get the data while you’re there.

During one of our Boston at Night workshops I took three exposures of the skyline from Fan Pier.  Those that were there know that I heartily encouraged that they do the same>>even if they didn’t have an HDR software program!  The sky was great and the Boston skyline is a great part of why we love New England!  So, get the shot.  The skyline is an easy scene to recognize that HDR will help you get the image you saw.  Our eyes are great at being able to see into both the shadows and the highlights but our cameras can’t match that (yet).  Being able to recognize if a scene should be captured with muliple exposures can be difficult at times but the ‘general’ rule is to use HDR techniques when the scene has a high contrast range within it.

Photomatix & Nik’s HDR Efx pro are two widely used and respected HDR software programs.  I use both depending on the subject. I find that Photomatix is great for scenics with trees & grass, etc whereas I think Nik’s is great for architecture in particular.  There is another choice that is not so widely known: Enfuse (http://www.photographers-toolbox.com/products/lrenfuse.php) which works directly in Lightroom as a plug-in (Very cool!).  It’s reasonably priced and provides a natural looking result. I tried it yesterday and like what I see.  You might too.

The image above is what the camera thought was correct for the scene. Of course it averaged the bright sky & buildings in shadow to give us that result.  The 3 photos below are the result of different HDR processing techniques.  You might want to compare them to your own work especially if you’re looking for a ‘natural’ looking scene.  I like a color scene to have some ‘extra’ color but also like a scene to look natural as well.  Depends on your mood at the time (!) and what you feel the scene should look like!

So the 3 images below are with Enfuse, Photomatix (using Tone mapping) and Photomatix using (Fusion Auto). On the 2 Photomatix images I used the preset with no adjustments.  My findings are:
– I like the Photomatix with Tone mapping for my ‘extra’ color scenes but has some haloing and noise

Photomatix-Tone-mapping

 

 

 

 

 

– The Photomatix image with Fusion Auto is more realistic but has a very flat almost silvery look to it (can be hard to adjust in LR) with a small amount of noise but sharpens up well

Photomatix-Fusion Auto

 

 

 

 

 

– The Enfuse image is more natural and has very little noise and sharpens up quite well

Enfuse HDR

Which one do I like?  I need to run more tests but the Enfuse version is very good.  I’ve looked at other images of landscapes and found the Enfuse software to provide very good low noise results with a more natural look.
All versions need some work in Lightroom or other editing software to give them more contrast.  In summary, I would suggest you try Enfuse for yourself as you may find the results to help you to get the shot you want!
Bob Ring, June 2012

 

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