BE A PHOTOGRAPHER!

BE A PHOTOGRAPHER: Specializing in certain subjects is fine (macro, scenics, architecture…..). But if you want to learn more about what you really like to photograph shoot something different.  Know why?  It’ll help you in your use of your camera and improving your photography in general.

I went out today to photograph the Jumper Classic in NH and photographed horse jumping.  Now is this something I’m really interested in? No, not really!  Did I enjoy it? Absolutely.  Did I learn anything.  Absolutely!  Checking my backgrounds and using AI servo and not using image stabilization.  The photo here is one of my favorites (I got many by the way).   Look at the rider’s concentration and how balanced the horse is going over the jump.  And check out that little red flag.  I was taking my photos in bursts of three images at a time.  My early photos all showed the horse on the way down.  I had to anticipate to allow time for my brain to say “INDEX finger….take the shot NOW”.
All in all a great experience.  I would recommend something like this to all photographers whether you’re into horse jumping or not as it’s a very worthwhile learning experience for all photographers!
Regards, Bob Ring
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The Versatility of You

Digital Photography is incredible.  Never before has our potential as photographers been so unlimited.  Today’s cameras are loaded with technology and capable of producing a broad range of results.  All they need is our creativity to make them shine!  We all should strive to be the best photographers we can be; not just the best portrait photographer or sports photographer or wedding photographer.  Your camera is loaded with versatility and you should be as well.

For me, one of the greatest aspects of digital photography is the opportunities it offers.  Pour yourself a cup of coffee, or something a bit stronger if desired, and spend some time studying your camera.   Look it over and learn its buttons and menus.  Understand what YOU need to do to make adjustments in the field.  How do you change your ISO?  Where is your histogram?  Does your camera have bracketing for HDR shooting?  Can you view your images in Black and White?  How do you set focus tracking?  Where do you set file size?   Contemplate what the camera and its technology is capable of.  Then, think about what it can do when combined with your creativity.  It is critical to know your gear but, it is even more essential to realize your aspirations  as a photographer.  The camera is just a tool and, ultimately, it is only as good as you are.  How good do you want to be?   Be aware, be creative, and be versatile.

The latest line of DSLR’s, both pro and consumer grades, give us more versatility than ever.  Seven years ago I bought my first DSLR – the 6 megapixel Nikon D70s.  It was a great consumer grade camera but, struggled at any ISO higher than 400.  I shot scenic’s at ISO 100 and used ISO 400 for sports/low light shooting.  I never went over ISO 400 unless I had to:   very similar to how we worked with film when you think about it.   My new Nikon D800 is a 36 megapixel powerhouse that will transform 35mm digital photography as we know it.  Right now, it gives me once unimaginable potential and versatility.  I welcome  that.
When I was a film shooter and headed to Maine for a weekend, I would typically bring 10 rolls of Fuji Velvia for pretty scenic’s, 10 rolls of 400 speed Fuji Provia for shooting in lower light, and 5 rolls of Kodak Black and White TMAX 400.  Each film had a job to do that was necessary but, costly and, at times, frustrating.  It would never seem to fail that I had half a roll of Velvia still left in my F5 but, now wanted to shoot a portrait in Black and White.  Instead of wasting film, I wasted opportunities.  Now, I dial a button and blow away anything that those films could ever do.  Think about that.  Think about the amazing versatility of that from a technology standpoint.  Now, think about the versatility of that as a photographer.  In a moments notice you can adapt to any situation and capture it with beautiful results.  That is not only very exciting but, it is highly empowering.
All of us should be very excited at the options available to us through technology.   The increasing resolution of today’s camera’s gives us breathtaking detail.  Being able to produce high quality images at ISO’s of 1600, 3200, and 6400 is mind boggling.   I can be in my garden shooting macro shots at ISO 100 and capture fine detail and rich colors.  A short time later, in order to defeat a frustrating breeze,  I can change my ISO to 800 and create a sharp, abstract image with similarly beautiful results. Then, just a few minutes later, change my ISO to 3200 and catch a GREAT portrait of my cat in poor, indoor light.  The power of versatility.   Wow.  No, seriously, Wow!!  
Technology continues to grow at an amazing pace but, to make it effective you must grow as well.  Having the latest, greatest camera does not make you a photographer.  YOU make yourself a photographer.  Push the limits of technology but, push your imagination just as far.  Nurture your creative energy, embrace the versatility of your camera, and harness the power of “you”.   The LCD screen and histogram give immediate feedback on your successes, your failures, and your necessary adjustments but, the best results all come from within.
How Versatile are You?
Don
“Photograph What You Feel”
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Old Friends

I turn to my camera often when I am compelled to be creative and expressive.  My trusty Nikon’s never fail to be a source of great comfort for me.    I feel safe with them, secure with them, and inspired with them.  They are constant companions and familiar “friends” as I explore my world and pursue my love of photography.  The images I make are a part of me.  They too are like old friends but, what happens to the images I DON’T process?

The creative process, for me, is something very personal, spiritual, and meaningful.  Every photo is taken with great purpose but, not every one works as a “final” image.   Too often my expectations exceed the final results but, one characteristic of experience is that I shoot less frames and come away with more “keepers”.  My workflow dictates that I immediately make a folder of my subject, download my images into the folder, and mark the images that I believe are notable.  Once done with those I make another pass through and look for more keepers.  I always find more but, inevitably there are many that never get much of a look, let alone processed.  I keep every image unless there is something excessively wrong with the photo.  Like my cameras, ALL of these images are my friends.  Like real life friends, we need to visit with them and nurture them and learn from them; even our mistakes.  They should not be forgotten.

I feel it is VERY important to go back and review your images at another time.  Almost every time I do this, I find an overlooked gem that now resonates with me.  In our enthusiasm to process what we believe to be good, we hurriedly overlook failed images that we can learn from and still work on.  Our skill set with software does nothing but improve and the software itself becomes more and more powerful.  Re-visiting our images from this year, last year, and years before should become an integral part of our creative process.  The advancements in Lightroom, HDR software, and Nik Software broaden our ability for post production.  Dig deep into your creativity and you WILL find more quality images in your library.   If nothing else, you will reconnect with images, places, and people who have meaning for you.

Go ahead, take the time to say hi to an old friend today; one way or another.

Don

“Photograph What You Feel”

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The Inspiration of Water

It is a rainy start to the day here.  I like it.

There is rain that whispers softly past your window and there is rain that steadily hammers against your roof.  Each have they’re own unique sounds and moods that, if you listen and feel, can brighten your day and inspire you.  This morning’s rain is quiet, gentle, and soothing.   Soon, the rain will saturate all of Spring’s colors and make everything look lush and alive.  The overcast sky serves as a giant softbox which lights the landscape evenly and softly.  There is no better light.  I would love to be out with my camera and a macro lens this morning!   How ironic that rain nourishes and rejuvenates everything that it touches, yet we look at such days as gloomy.  Rain brings us one of our most critical resources and greatest photographic subjects:  water.

Water is beautiful.  The woods of  New England are alive with trickling streams and proud rivers that make for wonderful  subjects.  Streams tend to be lined with moss covered boulders, colored rocks, and waterfalls.  All of these elements create dramatic patterns and shapes that allow for many compositions.   Waterfalls are mesmerizing, beautiful, and very powerful.  It is challenging to capture the feel of their strength in your images but, if successful the results can be dramatic.   Before you start making images, watch and listen to the movement of the water.  FEEL the scene around you and identify what appeals to you about the patterns, shapes, and sounds.  The more you open your senses to the scene in front of you, the more you can utilize the tools in your camera bag, and imagination, to create meaningful images.

 

A Polarizing Filter is almost a necessity when photographing water but, a Neutral Density filter is an option that you use to delve further into your creativity.  The job of a polarizing filter is to eliminate reflections and glare.  By rotating the front element of the filter you can control the shine from reflective rocks, leaves, and water that create distracting highlights within your composition.  Neutral Density filters come in varying strengths and are used to block light.  Less light means longer exposures which result in varying effects to the movement of water.  This is where your emotions take over.  How you connect to your scene will translate to your images.  The longer your exposure, the more smooth and silky the water will appear.  The faster your shutter speed, the more action will be frozen in the scene.  There is NO right or wrong; it is all about how YOU feel about the action and the final message:  YOUR message.  As in all photography, certain tools help you more than others but, nothing has a more dramatic effect than your own creativity.  Photograph what you feel!

Water is unpredictable and yet, consistent.  Be it a river or the sea, water moves with alluring purpose.  I admire that it never fails to find its’ way.  I love its’ varying sounds and sensual movements.  I envy its unwavering tenacity and strength as well as its’ dangerous fierceness.  I cherish its soothing nature.  I need its’ humble nurturing.  I am drawn to everything about water: it’s all so beautiful and necessary.
Water is inspiring.
DET 2012
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